Apply Now

Eliminating barriers for advancing biomedical science

The Integrated Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at the University of Notre Dame is a cross-departmental PhD program for research and training in a range of fields in the biomedical sciences. Scientists across the campus, representing 55 different research groups, are organized into thematic Research and Training Clusters that offer students the opportunity to engage in cutting-edge biomedical research that transcends traditional departmental and disciplinary boundaries. Explore our program here, or download a brochure that describes the key aspects.

Recent News

Half a Million Dollars FY 2019 DURIP Grant is Awarded to the Center for Informatics and Computational Science (CICS)

Author: Mayra Ballines

Hyperscale Data Centers

Half a Million Dollars FY 2019 DURIP Grant is Awarded to the Center for Informatics and Computational Science (CICS) for Artificial Intelligence (AI) Research applied to Scientific and Engineering Applications

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Computational Mathematics Program has awarded half a million dollars of the FY 2019 Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) Grant to the Center for Informatics and Computational Science (CICS) for “Physics-Constrained Deep Learning research”. Read More

NDnano offers collaborative seed grants; proposal deadline is May 31

Author: Heidi Deethardt

Seed Grant Program700

Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano) is accepting proposals from Notre Dame faculty in the Colleges of Science and Engineering for one-year seed grants. The purpose of the funding is to stimulate cross-college and cross-disciplinary research that broadens and deepens the understanding of complex scientific questions and grand technical challenges. Read More

Researchers create a new and quicker way to detect platin drug allergies for cancer patients

Author: Nina Welding

Basar Bilgicer 2 800x440

Platins, the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, are displaying an alarming rise in drug hypersensitivity reactions much more severe than the watery eyes or runny noses associated with hay fever, which is also a Type 1, immediate hypersensitivity reaction. A Notre Dame-led team has developed a safer way of determining hypersensitivity in patients. Read More