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Elizabeth Harper (University of Notre Dame)

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Location: 244 DeBartolo Hall

Abstract: 

Age-related diseases currently have very few options for treatment. Aged tissues experience higher levels of cellular senescence than their younger counterparts, and recent studies have pointed to the these increased senescent populations as a potential regulator of age-related disease. This seminar assesses the role of senescent cells in regulating physical function, showing a decrease in physical function following the transplantation of senescent cells. Therapies that target senescent cells, termed senolytics, are shown to negate the effects of transplanted senolytic cells, as well as increase health and lifespan in aged mice.

 

References:

  1. Xu, M., Pirtskhalava, T., Farr, J.N., Weigand, B.M., Palmer, A.K., Weivoda, M.M., Inman, C.L., Ogrodnik, M.B., Hachfeld, C.M., Fraser, D.G., et al. (2018). Senolytics improve physical function and increase lifespan in old age. Nature Medicine 24, 1246–1256.

 

 

Originally published at chemistry.nd.edu.