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Attacking cancer at its roots

Author: Stephanie Healey

Reggie Hill

Reginald Hill, the Archibald Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology, has published an article, “Attacking Cancer at its Roots,” on the website Science 2034.  Science 2034 is an initiative from The Science Coalition that asks scientists, policy makers, and thought leaders to share what they think science will do for individuals, society and the world 20 years from now. Read More

New Notre Dame-IUSM study examines important Ebola protein

Author: William G. Gilroy

Rob Stahelin

A new study by Robert Stahelin, an adjunct associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and an associate professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend, as well as a member of Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health, investigates how the most abundant protein that composes the Ebola virus, VP40, mediates replication of a new viral particle. Read More

Notre Dame and major New York medical group to collaborate on biomedical research

Author: Arnie Phifer

Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

The University of Notre Dame and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have announced a plan to collaborate on biomedical research projects, student training, joint conferences and other forms of academic exchange.

The Feinstein Institute was founded in 1999 to host the research operations for the North Shore-LIJ Health System. As a leading nonprofit research institute with more than 15,000 patients and volunteers participating in studies each year, this partnership will allow both organizations access to data sets, patient trials and groundbreaking innovations. Read More

New study identifies potential targets for personalized cancer vaccines

Author: Stephanie Healey

Notre Dame researchers and their collaborators explain how identifying distinctions between mutant (yellow) and normal (orange) immune targets can help locate neo-epitopes that elicit anti-cancer immune responses

A team of University of Notre Dame scientists, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Connecticut, have announced the results of a new study on identifying potential targets for personalized cancer vaccines. The paper, “Genomic and bioinformatic profiling of mutational neoepitopes reveals new rules to predict anticancer immunogenicity,” was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The research group at Notre Dame was led by Brian Baker, associate dean for research and graduate studies and professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and included Steven Corcelli, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and graduate student Cory Ayers. Read More

Notre Dame researcher working to understand and combat Ebola virus

Author: William G. Gilroy

Rob Stahelin

The largest outbreak of the Ebola virus in history currently occurring in West Africa has raised fears that the disease may soon spread to the United States. However, a University of Notre Dame researcher who studies the virus believes that, while there are grounds for concern, there is no need to panic. Read More

Potential biomarker proves promising for pancreatic cancer diagnostics

Author: Katrina Burgos

ending_pancreatic_cancer

When it comes to a cancer diagnosis, timing can be everything. An early diagnosis can make a big difference when it comes to treatment possibilities. Pancreatic Ductile Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a 5 year survival rate of 6% according to Dr. Reginald Hill, Archibald Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology at the University of Notre Dame. Improving detection rates is a crucial step in changing that statistic. Read more... Read More

New paper provides important insights into how carcinoma-associated fibroblasts function in breast cancers

Author: William G. Gilroy

Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs)

A new paper by a team of researchers led by Zachary T. Schafer, Coleman Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame, offers important new insights into the role carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play in tumor biology.

A number of recent studies have revealed CAFs to be a major contributor to tumor progression through a variety of mechanisms. Despite this information, the precise role CAFs play in augmenting the growth of tumors is still poorly understood. Read More

Targeting Cancer

Author: Angela Cavalieri

At the Harper Cancer Research Institute, Notre Dame professor Z. Basar Bilgicer has found a way to focus chemotherapy on cancer cells while leaving healthy cells untouched.

By Michael Rodio ’12 | Apr. 23, 2014

 

In the fight against cancer, chemotherapy is a race against time. While chemotherapy kills the tumor, it also kills healthy tissue. So chemotherapy must do its job—eliminate cancerous growth Read More

Researchers in the Wingert lab identify new genetic components involved in kidney development

Author: Rebecca Wingert

Christina Cheng, Zoe Li, Valerie Verdun, and Rebecca Wingert
Christina Cheng, Zoe Li, Valerie Verdun, and Rebecca Wingert

A study conducted by a team of scientists in the laboratory of Rebecca Wingert, Assistant Professor, Elizabeth and Michael Gallagher Family Professorship in Adult Stem Cell Research in the Department of Biological Sciences, has provided novel insights into the genetic program of kidney cell development. Read More

Notre Dame scientists develop largest developmental proteomic data set for any animal

Author: Gene Stowe and Marissa Gebhard

Xenopus laevis, or African clawed frog

Now that the human genome is sequenced, University of Notre Dame researchers are focusing on the study of the proteome, which is the protein content of an organism, tissue or cell. Bioanalytical chemist Norman Dovichi and molecular biologist Paul Huber have successfully tracked the changing patterns of protein expression during early development of Xenopus laevis, or African clawed frog, embryos. They have developed the largest data set on developmental proteomics for any organism, and have included the single-cell zygote. Read More

Second largest research award at Notre Dame fights malaria and dengue fever

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Neil Lobo and Nicole Achee

University of Notre Dame biologists Nicole Achee and Neil Lobo are leaders of an international $23 million research grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Their five-year project will generate the data required to show the effectiveness of a new paradigm in mosquito control — spatial repellency — for the prevention of two important mosquito-borne diseases: malaria and dengue fever.

Watch video Read More

A new way to counter ovarian cancer’s drug resistance

Author: Michael Rodio

Standing at a microscope in her Harper Hall laboratory, Karen Cowden Dahl, adjunct assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend, is scanning through a petri dish filled with cancer cells that could represent a major step forward in ovarian cancer research. Read More

Notre Dame and Loyola join forces against cancer

Author: William G. Gilroy

Karen Dahl lab, Harper Hall

The University of Notre Dame and Loyola University Chicago are joining forces in a multidisciplinary cancer research collaboration.

The goal of the alliance is to provide direct support for revolutionary new cancer research, with the ultimate objective of making cancer a more manageable, and potentially curable, disease. Read More