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Eliminating barriers for advancing biomedical science

The Integrated Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at the University of Notre Dame is a cross-departmental PhD program for research and training in a range of fields in the biomedical sciences. Scientists across the campus, representing 55 different research groups, are organized into thematic Research and Training Clusters that offer students the opportunity to engage in cutting-edge biomedical research that transcends traditional departmental and disciplinary boundaries. Explore our program here, or download a brochure that describes the key aspects.

Recent News

Researchers work to Unlock Clues to How Cells Move through the Body

Author: Nina Welding

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A team of researchers, led by Notre Dame's Zhangli Peng and co-investigator Juan del Alamo of the University of California at San Diego, is studying the transmigration of red blood cells through inter-endothelial slits in the spleen, the narrowest point in the body through which these cells travel, to provide important clues in a variety of physiological and pathological processes and potentially impact the design of artificial organs and other biomedical devices. Read More

Slashing sweets before chemo may make treatment more effective

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Colorectal cancer patients may benefit by avoiding sweets for three days before chemotherapy and by taking a common antimalaria drug, according to new research by biochemistry doctoral student Monica Schroll.

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Schroll, Amanda Hummon, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and two others studied a two-pronged method of weakening colorectal cancer cells to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy, Read More

New research suggests climate change could accelerate mosquito-borne disease epidemics

Author: Sarah Craig

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Bad news for humans about the spread of mosquito-borne disease as climate change continues to worsen. New research from the University of Notre Dame, recently published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, proposes a new way that climate change could contribute to mosquitos’ capacity to drive disease epidemics. As climate change continues to rise, so could the speed of epidemics of mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and Zika.    Read More